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philomytha
16 January 2015 @ 09:17 am
If you want to find my fic, the best place to look is at my user page at AO3, where all my fic is archived. There is also a chronological index of the Vorkosigan fic, which is most of it. Or you can look through the tags here.

I am no longer updating this list, but I will keep it in case it's useful to anyone.
Fic hereCollapse )
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philomytha
17 November 2014 @ 11:20 am
I feel like I should put my classical education to some good use, even if it's probably not the use my tutors envisaged when I was studying this. Commentary on the Iliad with spoilers for Foxglove SummerCollapse )

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philomytha
16 November 2014 @ 08:09 pm
Cub knows how to swear. I guess it was inevitable, and at least all he says is 'oh damn'. You see, today he fell into a small pond. It was so covered in algae and weeds that it looked exactly like lawn, and though I shouted for him to stop, I wasn't close enough to grab him and he didn't believe me over the apparent evidence of his eyes that he could walk on it. So in he fell, and after I fished him out and the screaming was over, the swearing and storytelling began. 'Wet, oh damn, pond, wet, oh damn oh damn, wet wet water pond, oh damn.' He went on like that for some time. Well, swearing is a good creative use of language to communicate emotion, so I can't really bring myself to object very much.

As you can see, we're also getting words strung together now. Sometimes with implied grammar, like 'go car home', other times just juxtaposition of ideas like 'window dark' (= it's dark outside). And he's picking up new words all the time and parroting back what he hears around him constantly. 'Pond', for instance, was a new word today, and I think he's very clear on what ponds are now. We get some lovely connections too. I have an alphabet book called 'Apple Pie ABC' (which is a superb toddler book, if anyone has a toddler or needs a gift for one) and Cub loves it and calls it 'apple book' which makes sense. Anyhow, when I sing the alphabet song, he calls that 'apple' too now, and points at my mouth and says 'apple' when he wants me to sing it. He really works to get the maximum amount of meaning out of the words he knows how to say, it's amazing.

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philomytha
11 November 2014 @ 03:06 pm
I have Foxglove Summer! And I've read it once very fast. And I love it and I love Peter so very much and it was fantastic and I'm going to be going back to read it again really soon.

first random thoughts full of spoilersCollapse )

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philomytha
Cub is continuing to do entertaining things with language. lots of baby talkCollapse )

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philomytha
07 November 2014 @ 09:18 pm
I wrote two Rivers of London fics for Trick or Treat, both for the lovely linndechir who wrote a letter full of excellent plot bunnies. They are:

Title: Longhouse
Content: Peter/Nightingale, casefic, h/c, haunted houses
Length: 17,000 words
Summary: On a case outside of London, Peter and Nightingale face danger, death and architecture.

Title: Target Practice
Content: fluff
Length: 1000 words
Summary: Peter's having trouble sleeping.

I'm pretty pleased with myself for managing to get Longhouse finished in the time allocated. I've been wanting to bring Peter and Nightingale into my neck of the woods for a while now, and then I was reading a book of local mythology and supernatural stories and it mentioned people getting lost and going into mysterious houses for shelter and then when they come back the next day the house isn't there. (There were some fantastic ghost stories too, at least one of which I'm going to be using elsewhere because it was genuinely bone-chilling.) So anyhow, I stuck that together with linndechir's perfect-for-me prompt of Peter and Nightingale getting soaked and snuggling together to warm up, and then I got them lost in bad weather on Dartmoor. The house kind of developed organically out of that, and the fact that I was up on Hound Tor on the weekend that I was brainstorming this and there's the mediaeval village of longhouses there and I ended up sitting inside one with Philomythulus for about half an hour because he was trying to hide from the crowd of schoolkids who were up there looking at them. So that's when the house came together. But lost-in-bad-weather-in-vanishing-house wasn't interesting enough for my taste, so I figured the house could be trying to kill them and that was how I figured out the murders that brought Peter and Nightingale to Dartmoor in the first place. I'm really enjoying writing casefic lately and it was fun figuring out what could happen and working out how they were going to escape the house. The unofficial motto of this story was, when in doubt drop something on their heads.

Anyhow, those were the fics I wrote. There were two other Rivers of London fics for the exchange, and I really loved them both. One was my wonderful gift by originally, Nae doubt but ye may get a sight, a lovely funny story about a magical mishap at the Folly which really gets the humorous canon voice perfectly. The other was a spooky atmospheric story of Peter and Nightingale in a graveyard at Hallowe'en, A noise of falling weights that never fell by linndechir. I highly recommend them both.

And as well as Rivers of London, I received another fic for Trick or Treat, The Human Spirit by brutti_ma_buoni, for The West Wing featuring a ghost haunting the Chief of Staff's office, and it's funny and absolutely adorable.

Crossposted at http://philomytha.dreamwidth.org/131051.html. There are comment count unavailable comments there.
 
 
 
philomytha
30 October 2014 @ 09:54 pm
Oh wow that was satisfying. Some scattershot thoughts. massive spoilersCollapse )

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philomytha
27 October 2014 @ 09:35 pm
So I requested this for Yuletide and I wrote a little fandom pimping post there, but I suppose I should say something about it generally as well, because people who read my fics probably, on average, like slashy books about loyalty and h/c.

This has been one of my most loved books for a long time. I read it in my early teens and it's sort of been formative for me along with Rosemary Sutcliff and a bunch of YA historical novels nobody else has ever heard of. It's set during the 1745 Jacobite uprising in Scotland, and our heroes are Ewen Cameron, a minor Highland clan chief, and Major Keith Wyndham, an English army officer. The book charts their meetings, their friendship, their increasing loyalty and affection for each other, and the choices it leads them to face when their friendship and their political alliegances conflict.

So much for the serious summary of the story. The fannish reasons why you should read it: so much loyalty kink. So much hurt/comfort (so much!). So much slashiness. So many conflicts of duty and conscience. Misunderstandings! Daring escapes! Fate! Adventures! Keith snarkily calling Ewen 'my Achilles' and deliberately insulting him with money!

Keith is a lonely, sardonic, cynical man who's never had a close friend. Ewen is a romantic, generous, honourable, touchily proud man who's embedded in a web of loyalty and love. Keith, naturally, is drawn to Ewen. Plus, it's Fate. I'm not sure about the Fate plotline, but there you go, it's part of the book, complete with mystic seer and significant animals and all the trimmings. They are Fated to meet five times, and Keith is Fated to do Ewen a great service, and cause him terrible pain. And that's pretty much what happens, and it's beautiful and tragic and heartbreaking and gorgeous.

And then did I mention the hurt/comfort? There's a lot of it, and it's just right. Now I love h/c as you all know, but I'm also a bit picky about it. Too little, not enough emphasis given to it, and it's frustrating, it's annoying, it's like looking at a picture of a really tasty chocolate. Too much and it's embarrassing and silly, like eating an entire box of chocolates at once. But this is absolutely spot-on. And I think I might have had a thing for one guy collapsing into another's arms before I read this book, but if you don't, you will by the time you finish.

Now before Broster wrote Heron, she wrote another book in which she plays around with all the ideas she perfects in Heron. This is The Wounded Name, which is so OTT slashy and full of so much h/c that when I was reading it for the first time I had to keep stopping and putting it down and walking away to have a breather from the endless intensity of it all. But it's great. I mean, if you want to read about our hero admiring his beloved's beautiful hair, rescuing him from drowning, nursing him tenderly in prison for about 200 pages and then going on the run with him, sheltering him with his body in a ditch from a thunderstorm (yes, really), and generally dedicating his entire life to him, this is your book. It's so slashy the author and characters notice a few times and our hero's family say, well, he must be in love, the way he's carrying on. And he is, undoubtedly. You could fill in about a dozen sex scenes and not change a single thing about the character dynamics. It's great. It's not a brilliant book, but if you have the right buttons, it does a wild dance on top of them.

But anyway, The Flight of the Heron is a genuinely good book that contains my ideal ratio of idtastic stuff to general story and adventure, and everyone should read it.

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philomytha
26 October 2014 @ 08:53 pm
Had some fun watching the first half of The Lions of Nemea. SpoilersCollapse )

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philomytha
23 October 2014 @ 09:40 pm
That episode just blew me away. spoilersCollapse )

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philomytha
Current toddler word is, I'm sorry to say, 'piss'. He means peas, which are one of his favourite things to eat when they're frozen, but once they're cooked he's not interested. I don't know why this is.

Other Cub-isms: 'quack quack' is what all birds say. I have to say seagulls do sound quite a lot like they're saying quack. He's now got 'bus' and 'lorry' sorted out, but 'van' is now 'mum', somewhat to my confusion. He can also distinguish the sound of a train going by from the sound of an airplane taking off at the airport and shouts the correct one when he hears them from inside the house. Other words he knows are 'rain', 'wet', 'water' and 'puddle' - guess what kind of weather we've been having?

Even more adorably, he is starting to play with dolls and stuffed animals. We have Baby and Dogga who both go everywhere with him and Baby had his mouth stuffed with 'nammie' (jam) at breakfast today, and a different Baby who he wouldn't let go of at bedtime last night and which I had to extract from under the sheets after he was asleep (it was a small Lego person so I didn't really want to leave it with him all night). So this is what these toys are for! I know I used to play with dolls and stuffed animals, but Philomythulus mostly used them for putting into a bag and then tipping out again, and I was starting to have doubts as to whether children really did still play with them. But Cub chatters to his and puts them in the toy pram and pushes them around and sits them with him at meals and had a tantrum when I wouldn't let him take Dogga into the bath last night. Stuffed animals don't bathe well. Even more incredibly, he's doing all this pretty spontaneously, because I'd practically forgotten we even had these toys and haven't particularly shown him what to do with them. He just knows.

But the thing that gets me most of all is the insistence on communicating. He WILL NOT STOP until you acknowledge what he said, even if you're trying to do sixteen other things at the time, and he will just keep on telling me about everything he sees and does all day long. It's incredible. Where did he get this fearsome determination to communicate and can I steal a bit and give it to his big brother?

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philomytha
15 October 2014 @ 06:09 pm
There's this long essay on Tumblr about Rivers of London and I read it and in the midst of rather more literary-academic jargon than I really care for, I did find this interesting bit of research and analysis:

When Peter is told he is a wizard, he asks if he is like Harry Potter, and is told by Nightingale that he differs because: “I’m not a fictional character”[19] From the diegesis that the hero inhabits, this places Harry Potter as fiction, to that worlds reality. From the narrator perspective, however, which operates on level nearer that of the author, this statement takes on further meaning, a hint to our level of reality—he isn’t just not a fictional character within the fictional story, but perhaps, not a fictional character at all. Sir Thomas Nightingale, 1st Baronet of Newport Pond, Essex—the High Sherrif of Essex in 1627, died 1644—would certainly be a fitting candidate, whose family arms are symbolic of peace, harmony, political cunning with an armed serjant Ibex—a defensive pose, fitting of a defender of the peace—and a motto of, “For King and Country”.[20] His death falls within two years of Newton’s birth,[21] who becomes the founder of the magic society in Rivers of London, and so would fit well in the story.


Here are the Nightingale baronets on Wikipedia. I think the details in Broken Homes about his siblings and Uncle Stanley point away from this being correct, not to mention the fact that Nightingale is written as a gentleman from the early twentieth century rather than the seventeenth, but it's a fascinating idea all the same. I would have no difficulty believing Nightingale was part of the family.

Of course, if he is the first Sir Thomas Nightingale, the subsequent holders of the title all have a bit of a problem...

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philomytha
14 October 2014 @ 01:30 pm
It's a funny thing, I've formally studied grammar in other languages, but in English my grammar is all intuitive and done by feel. This means that sometimes I write stuff and it sounds right but then I start second-guessing and confusing myself and get into a muddle, and nowhere is this more of an issue than with relative pronouns. Here's today's puzzler:

Toby was sleeping in a basket in front of the big black range cooker that was top-of-the-line technology in 1930 and which Molly refuses to let us replace.

Why did I write 'that' as the first pronoun, and 'which' as the second? Because it feels like I could swap them or use the same word both times - either of them - and it wouldn't sound wrong, but now I don't know which way is best.

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philomytha
11 October 2014 @ 04:21 pm
I meant to finish this for the Countdown to Foxglove Summer, but that didn't quite work out. But here it is now.

Title: Lone Wolf
Length: 1700 words
Content: spoilers for Broken Homes, missing scene
Summary: Varvara's perspective on the finale of Broken Homes.

Lone WolfCollapse )

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philomytha
04 October 2014 @ 09:48 pm
Kill the MoonCollapse )

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philomytha
04 October 2014 @ 09:24 am
It's nine thirty in the morning, I've been up since five, and there are potatoes in my washing machine.

I'd ask to start the day again except that it might be something worse. In between rearranging the kitchen, Cub keeps demanding I read to him and then throwing the book away in disgust when it turns out to be the wrong book, and then demanding another one. I'm not sure the right book even exists.

At least I noticed the potatoes before I turned it on. Apparently the child lock on the washing machine isn't as good as I thought.

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philomytha
02 October 2014 @ 09:59 pm
Okay, I'm spamming you all today and I'm not sure anyone else is even watching this, but: spoilers for season 4Collapse )

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philomytha
02 October 2014 @ 01:00 pm
Why does this always happen to me? I've been on a Georgette Heyer binge lately, because sometimes that's exactly what you need. Anyhow, I finished The Convenient Marriage last night and damn, why did I read that three days too late to nominate it for Yuletide? Because Rule/Lethbridge is just BEGGING to be written, after that duel scene. Or Rule/Lethbridge/Horry, if you like; I could be persuaded in that direction too. But Rule/Lethbridge backstory is what I really want, there were so many hints. I have to say I adore the camp eighteenth century novels, in some ways more than the true Regency ones. I love the way the characters speak, and the villains are so much more fun.

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philomytha
30 September 2014 @ 11:38 am
- Here is a list of all the words I heard Cub use yesterday: uppa, down, door (this was used multiple times in different contexts including clothing, pan lids, and his mouth when he sneezed), steps, juicie, spill, towel, horsie, duckie, doggie, dat one, o dear, o dam, dat way, nonono, water, jam, beebies (as in CBeebies), gadaker, tree, tea, shoes, buckle, nappy, stuck, tissue, help, window, ourcar (there's a story behind this one: whenever we go past a parked car he tries the doorhandles, and I tell him no, that's not our car, and he has concluded that our car is called ourcar. There are also bluecars which are a specific subset of cars. I'm not sure if he understands the idea of labelling by colour yet, but bluecars are different from regular cars.) I'd guess he has an expressive vocabulary of about 50-70 words right now. His receptive vocabulary is huge, maybe five to ten times as much. It really amazes me how much he understands and how quickly he picks up new words from context with only minimal clues.

- Philomythulus wanted something yesterday. He signed, vigorously and repeatedly, while saying 'pah' over and over again. I had absolutely no idea what the sign meant (they teach him lots at school, which is great, but they don't tell them to me, and also he randomly invents signs when he doesn't know them or uses the signs he does know for other meanings). So I tried to get him to point to what he wanted, and when that failed I tried to get him to draw a picture of it. He got pen and paper, sat down next to me, gave me the pen and tried to put my hand to the paper. He really genuinely believed that I could draw a picture of what he was thinking of, and had no conception of the idea that I might not know everything that's inside his head. It's no wonder he finds life frustrating when he believes that I know what he wants but am making him jump through these excessively complex hoops before I let him have it. I'm not really that much in sympathy with Baron-Cohen's broader autism theories, but in this respect, it's pretty clear that he's right about Philomythulus having barely any of what he calls theory of mind: he really doesn't grasp that things that he knows/thinks are not necessarily known by everyone else. And you can see how you get from there to all sorts of difficulties with communication.

It was a blueberry muffin, we finally figured out by dint of wandering around the house pointing at things. Unfortunately they were all gone. He indicated that I should bake some more from scratch for him. I declined and we compromised on toast.

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philomytha
21 September 2014 @ 05:31 pm
- I am currently reading Each Peach Pear Plum out loud an average of twenty times per day. As soon as we get to the end Cub wants to go back to the beginning again. Now I'm not unsympathetic to this urge; I often want to go back to the beginning of books as soon as I get to the end too. But even I have my limits. Anyhow, I'm starting to think this book is a horror movie in disguise. Why are the characters all hiding? Why do so many of them suffer unpleasant accidents? Why are some of them shooting at others? Who thought it was a good idea to give Baby Bear a shotgun anyway?

- I'm not sure whether Cub is trolling me, he's got a very vivid imagination, or he's not quite as sure about 'nee-naw' as I thought. He was trotting a plastic sheep up and down the kitchen floor yesterday evening saying 'nee-naw, nee-naw, nee-naw.'

- New word of the day: prickly. We were sitting on the swing and he suddenly points behind me and says, distinctly, 'prickly.' I look around, and he's pointing to a small sucker of holly. I have previously warned him about not touching holly because it's prickly, but I hadn't expected him to remember and reproduce the word, not to mention recognise the plant. I'm not sure why some things stick in his head and not others.

- A plaintive wail from the living room, 'Tucku, tucku.' I go to investigate. Cub is indeed stuck, as often happens when you use a small child's chair to try to climb onto the sofa, the chair overbalances and you're left precariously hanging between the sofa and the chair.

- I mentioned 'Ididit' the other day, for dirty nappies. This has now transmuted to 'diddy' and moved into our household language: have you done a diddy in your nappy? Also we have 'wee'. I am ridiculously pleased by these signs that I might have a child I can toilet train without requiring the intervention of fifteen professionals. That's the kind of thing that makes me feel inadequate as a parent. Admittedly none of the fifteen professionals could manage it either with Philomythulus.

- Adorable thing of the day: Mr P is out mowing the lawn. Cub is toddling after him pushing a toy pram and clearly convinced that he's helping. He's also pointing at bits of lawn and shouting 'over dere, over dere' - I think he's worried that his dad is going to miss bits. Also he really loves bossing people around. This is a little worrying.

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philomytha
19 September 2014 @ 12:28 pm
delighted parental ramblingCollapse )

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philomytha
18 September 2014 @ 10:49 pm
Dear Trick-or-treater,

just a quick letterCollapse )

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philomytha
15 September 2014 @ 10:32 pm
1. I watched the first episode of the new season of Scott & Bailey and was reminded again of just how much I love these characters. Gill! Rachel! Janet! Excellent police procedurals where the main characters are all women! Still want a good crossover with Rivers of London, too.

2. Still enjoying Dr Who, and the latest episode was wonderfully scary. Also, I love Danny Pink.

3. Foxglove Summer teaser! In case you haven't seen it elsewhere, Aaronovitch posted part of the first chapter on his site here. I am not doing well at waiting, and this is not helping.

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philomytha
13 September 2014 @ 11:41 pm
My third fic for the Countdown to Foxglove Summer, and also for my h/c bingo prompt 'drowning'.

Title: The Fix
Content: h/c, missing scene
Length: 3500 words
Summary: What Nightingale was doing while Peter was hijacking an ambulance and falling into the Thames.

He still made me get up the next morning and do double practice--the bastard.Collapse )

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philomytha
10 September 2014 @ 07:42 pm
Just a heads-up to anyone on my flist who's interested: Scott & Bailey is back on tonight! I nearly missed it completely.

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philomytha
09 September 2014 @ 04:28 pm
Missed yesterday's happiness meme post due to falling asleep early last night. I don't really regret it, because item number one on my list for today is:

1. A really good night's sleep!
2. Apparently you can, in fact, make tea in a chocolate teapot. Someone's done it. I find both the fact that you can do it, and that someone spent the time figuring it out, equally delightful.
3. Glorious weather today, so I took Cub to the beach and we spent several hours paddling around in the water and chasing seagulls. All seagulls, to Cub, are 'duckies' and he gets very excited by them. The juvenile seagulls were all following their parents around cheeping continuously, which was kind of hilarious because they're the same size as the adults now but clearly think they're still chicks. Also, a couple of hours of Cub clinging to my legs and I'm impressed with the adult seagulls' patience, since they don't seem to mind. But Cub chased them all very industriously.

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philomytha
07 September 2014 @ 09:22 pm
Today in RL has been a bit dismal due to a nasty cold, so here are some fannish things that are making me happy:

1. Dr Who! I'm always so happy about Dr Who, it gets me excited about sitting down to watch TV. So many silly cracktastic things happen and then moments of high drama and it's just so fun. And this week's episode was perfect in that respect. Loved the Doctor and Robin Hood talking about heroes and stories, loved Clara's deeply impractical dress, loved the spaceship-castle, loved everything. And the preview for next week's episode looked wonderfully scary and will probably be too scary for me and I'll have to hide behind a pillow - but that's all part of the fun.

2. We're rewatching The West Wing and it really is so wonderful. I rarely watch anything more than once - which is why I don't generally write for TV fandoms, since I need multiple repetitions to get something into my head and I don't like watching TV shows more than once, I resent the time it takes - but I make an exception for The West Wing because it's just that good.

3. I've also been rereading the Lord Peter Wimsey books after writing that fic. It's been maybe a decade since I last picked them up, and they're still wonderfully fun and I still love Lord Peter a great deal.

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philomytha
06 September 2014 @ 10:01 pm
1. A lovely outing today, first to an unexpectedly brilliant craft-art festival where I saw some fantastic pieces. My favourites were the incredibly simple, beautiful porcelain bowl done as 'sunset', shading from a translucent yellow to an equally translucent purple; a clever, funny, intricate clay model of a man with lots of gears and wheels and steampunky stuff; and a textile piece depicting flowers that absolutely glowed, from a distance I would have sworn it was highly polished metalwork but it was all fabrics. And while we were there, we had a very nice lunch which involved a salad of roasted carrots and beetroot, cooled and dressed with dill. I need to recreate this at home, because it was incredibly tasty. And then to crown the day off we went for a lovely walk, and discovered at the end that we were in fact walking through Sir Edward Pellew's country estate. So that was fun.

2. Something that made me laugh a lot. Whenever Philomythulus goes anywhere, since he can't talk he has a communication book where I can write about his day in it and the staff at wherever he goes can write about what he does, so that we all know what's going on. Anyhow, from the respite centre yesterday was the following line: 'He was quite lethargic until 2.20pm when he suddenly wasn't.'

(All right, it's probably funnier if you know Philomythulus and know what him being 'not lethargic' is like, ie tearing around the place without stopping for hours on end yelling and shouting and bashing into walls and jumping on things and howling with laughter and climbing walls and furniture and tipping things on the floor and... well, it would tire out Miles Vorkosigan, let's put it that way.)

3. Cub-ism of the day: he wakes me up (at 6.45am, but this is a positivity meme so we won't go into that) and points to his nappy and says 'Ididit' over and over. I wake up, sniff, and realise that oh yes, he really has didit. Yes, even this evidence of communication makes me happy, plus, it gives me wild and optimistic thoughts of toilet training.

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philomytha
05 September 2014 @ 09:45 pm
Three happy things for today:

1. Taking Cub swimming is such good fun, and he's so easy! I can let him toddle out of the pool and he goes two steps away and looks at me and I tell him to come back and he comes back! And he enjoys splashing about with his armbands on so much and isn't scared of going out of his depth. I love swimming myself, and it's such fun teaching Cub.

2. I had an unexpected hour of nap myself in the afternoon while Cub slept off his swimming-pool exercise. Definitely needed, and very nice.

3. These things were both made possible by respite care for Philomythulus today. Hurrah for respite care!

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philomytha
04 September 2014 @ 09:38 pm
1. I appear to have introduced any number of people to mpreg who would never have gone near it otherwise. This warms my heart on so many different levels. (People trust my writing enough to try something they wouldn't have otherwise! Apparently I can in fact write mpreg in a way that entertains people! Aww you like me...)

2. Clean house! My parents were unhappy that, living in California, they couldn't give me much in the way of practical help with the two chaos-generators who run around my house all day. So as a Christmas present they arranged for me to have a cleaner come once a week. There is nothing so nice as going out leaving a house full of crumbs and sticky fingerprints, and coming home to find that everything's spotless. The kids have done their best to put a dent in the cleanliness already, but it was clean for an hour or so and very nice it was too.

3. Cub is talking! Today it was 'mybruder' meaning Philomythulus, followed by 'datway' - he was upset that his brother had jumped over the stairgate and gone upstairs where he couldn't chase him. He can talk! He can really say words to communicate ideas spontaneously! It is so amazing and honestly I could just post a positivity meme of 'what Cub said today' and be very very happy about it.

Crossposted at http://philomytha.dreamwidth.org/124123.html. There are comment count unavailable comments there.
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philomytha
03 September 2014 @ 08:45 pm
[personal profile] spatz tagged me for this little meme: The rules: during the next five days, post three positive things about your day and ask three people to do the same so the positive attitude can gain some ground. I'm awkward about asking people to do things, so anyone who wants a bit of encouragement to post or to write about positive things, consider yourself tagged.

1. Two sleeping children! They're both doing pretty well and being manageable, but still, it's nice to be able to knock off from hands-on parenting for a while.

2. Surviving the summer. I posted all about my fears for this summer a while back, but it's all working out about as well as could be expected, and school starts on Monday.

3. And for the third thing for today, I finished a fic! There was this conversation on tumblr about Nightingale mpreg, and, er, my brain ran away with it. I'd say I'm sorry, but I had way too much fun writing this for that to be true. I've never written mpreg before, but this fandom is doing weird things to my brain. I'd never written sex pollen or wingfic or undercover-as-gay before either, and I have a feeling (which is based on the contents of my WIP file, so it's a very accurate feeling) that this isn't going to be the crackiest thing I write in this fandom.

Title: Blessings
Content: mpreg, crack, established Peter/Nightingale, birth scene
Length: 4500 words
Summary: Peter does a favour for a fertility goddess, and gets an unexpected favour in return.

BlessingsCollapse )

Crossposted at http://philomytha.dreamwidth.org/123889.html. There are comment count unavailable comments there.
 
 
 
philomytha
02 September 2014 @ 08:16 am
I've already talked about Nice Town, but we've come across an assortment of other TV stuff lately.

Farscape
The first half-dozen or so episodes. I really liked it, awful rubber aliens and all. Aeryn Sun is wonderful if you like ruthless killing machines with a glimmering of a conscience, and the other two whose names I haven't yet managed to pick up (Blue Bald Priest Lady and Tentacle Beard Warrior Guy) remind me weirdly of Aral and Cordelia only without the UST. Especially Blue Bald Lady: do not underestimate woo-woo spiritual types when it comes to violence and determination. Also the whole thing is basically held together with tropes of every variety, which I find appealing. And I like the way John deals with aliens and trouble, and how he goes for negotiation and dialogue instead of mayhem and violence. I noticed it especially in the episode where they have the space locusts descend on their ship and what I was expecting - a Tribble-like plot about insect eradication - turned into a negotiation with a respected alien. I want to watch more of this, but for some reason my DVD people have stopped sending it to me.

Haven
Chosen on the basis of skimming the SF/drama sections of the DVD rental people and deciding to only go for things with a woman prominently on the promotional picture. This is rather patchy. In his recent interview Aaronovitch praises the virtues of stealing from crappy things and improving them, and I think that's the trouble with Haven: it's stolen its plot from Stephen King, and really all it can do is make it worse. But there's been enough fun stuff that I'm continuing to watch, and there's been some improvements in the last couple of episodes I've seen. The summary is, weird paranormal stuff keeps happening in Haven and it's down to local cop Nathan and FBI incomer Audrey to stop it. It's strange. But diverting and not too gruesome apart from that episode full of rotten food and vomiting; don't watch that one too soon after a meal.

The Man Who Never Was
Go here. Read about the craziest caper the British Intelligence services ever came up with. Laugh a lot. Go watch the film.

Millions Like Us
On my WW2 kick we also picked up this. I really liked it. It's a film about women's war work, made in 1943. I loved the little discussion about crossing class boundaries, I loved the stern courage of all the characters, and I found it absolutely fascinating to reflect that the people who made and acted in this film had no idea how the war was going to end. These were the stories they were telling themselves to keep going. Loved it.

Parks and Recreation, season 1
So I've heard this mentioned a lot, so I ordered it, watched a few episodes of season one and gave up in confusion. Apparently I should have started with season two? Does it really get a whole lot better? Because the premise is kind of fun, but we were mostly wincing and cringing our way through the episodes we watched and gave up without finishing the season.

Line of Duty, season 1
The anti-corruption squad in the Metropolitan Police investigate the Officer of the Year. This was good, if on the dark side of things (by my standards; I tend to avoid really dark stuff). Excellent characters, complex storytelling, everyone trying to determine the truth and find the line between good policing and following all the rules. I've watched both seasons of this now and I'd happily watch more, though I need to watch something like The West Wing afterwards to replenish my hope-and-mostly-good-people supplies again.

Dr Who: the movie
All Paul McGann's fault. It wasn't as terrible as I'd been led to believe, but I'd been led to believe 'really bad episode of Star Trek' terrible so there was scope for improvement. It was a silly action movie about the Doctor, inexplicably set in LA. But it had Paul McGann being tormented in a winding sheet, and skipping around in new shoes, and kissing Grace, and riding a motorbike very fast, so it didn't need to do much else. I do feel very cheated of a full TV season of McGann as the Doctor, though the audio dramas are good consolation in that respect.

Crossposted at http://philomytha.dreamwidth.org/123561.html. There are comment count unavailable comments there.
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philomytha
26 August 2014 @ 03:02 pm
Due to a continued fascination with Paul McGann's beautiful face and voice, I ended up watching 'Nice Town', the deeply obscure 1992 mini-series that stars him (available streaming online here (1, 2, 3) and otherwise almost impossible to get hold of).

The story is about how McGann's character and his family move back to live near his parents and brother, and he starts meddling in everyone's sex lives to try to make them all happier. Let's just say things don't go according to plan. It's very good. Also very weird, and rather envelope-pushing, but very good. I mean, what's not to like about infertility drama, conflicts over parenting style, McGann in an apron being the very broody stay-at-home partner while his wife works as a highly successful scientist, lots of stories about babies, family secrets coming out in the open, and incredible dark humour. Also more plot related to breastfeeding than I normally see in TV shows, but hey, why not?

It's not precisely 'Paul McGann: Manic Pixie Dream Girl', but it's about as close as you're ever likely to see. There are horrific shell suits and Eighties hair, but give it a try anyway and don't backbutton out in shock at the first three minutes because it will all make sense in the end, honestly. And it's so funny. I mean, the ambulance sequence! Hawaiian Sea Breeze! It would not have occurred to me to make a nasty burn, suicide attempt and heart attack funny, but the show manages it. And then there's the most hilarious line in the whole show: I'll put the kettle on - you'll have to watch it to get the joke.

I'm seriously tempted to request this for Yuletide now, if only I had a request in mind and if I thought anyone except me had watched it.

Crossposted at http://philomytha.dreamwidth.org/123263.html. There are comment count unavailable comments there.
 
 
 
philomytha
25 August 2014 @ 10:11 am
It's a soggy Bank Holiday Monday here and I'm stuck at home, so I think it's time for a meme about writing fic, pinched from [personal profile] umadoshi. Ask me a question or six!

lots of questionsCollapse )

Crossposted at http://philomytha.dreamwidth.org/123075.html. There are comment count unavailable comments there.
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philomytha
23 August 2014 @ 10:31 pm
I'm not what you'd call a serious Dr Who fan, but I've watched it since partway through Ten's run and I'm very happy to have a new series. And I managed to have both children in bed and asleep by eight o'clock, so I could almost watch it live for a wonder. Anyhow, here are some vague thoughts on the first episode, in no particular order:

cut for spoilersCollapse )

Crossposted at http://philomytha.dreamwidth.org/122841.html. There are comment count unavailable comments there.
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philomytha
17 August 2014 @ 02:15 pm
So you know I've been going on a bit about Paul McGann as Nightingale. And then I wrote a Wimsey/RoL crossover. And in the course of doing so, I spent a fair bit of time reading classic poetry about nightingales, because you know Wimsey would go there, and there's an awful lot to choose from because every poet in the world has written something about nightingales. And along the way I came across a quote that I was very sad not to be able to find a spot for in the story: Thou wast not born for death, immortal bird (Keats, Ode to a Nightingale). And I mentioned this quote in the comments on the fic. And some wonderful person came across this and made this photoset (not sure what the etiquette is about reproducing it here, so I'll just link you to the original).

I can't stop staring at it, it's so perfect. Like I say, I love everybody in this bar today :-D ♥

Crossposted at http://philomytha.dreamwidth.org/122455.html. There are comment count unavailable comments there.
 
 
 
philomytha
16 August 2014 @ 12:00 am
This is another of those fics where someone had better hide my delete key so's I can post it. Apparently RoL is making me write all the tropefics I can think of. This one, God help us, is Nightingale/Lord Peter Wimsey jazz age wingfic. But someone said that there was a shortage of queer Nightingale during the interwar period, and someone else mentioned the lack of Wimsey crossovers, and yet another person mentioned the lack of wingfic, and why go for one when you can have the hat trick and a novel slash pairing to crown it all? Plus, there needs to be some explanation for how Lord Peter survives that bit in Murder Must Advertise.

It's all tumblr's fault, I'm telling you.

Title: Of a Feather
Content: crossover, wingfic
Length: 1700 words
Summary: The Harlequin encounters a bird who lends him wings at a critical moment.

Of a FeatherCollapse )

Crossposted at http://philomytha.dreamwidth.org/122180.html. There are comment count unavailable comments there.
 
 
 
philomytha
12 August 2014 @ 10:37 am
My second entry for the Countdown to Foxglove Summer fest. This is also for my [community profile] trope_bingo 'curtainfic' prompt, and is all [personal profile] hedda62's fault: she suggested Molly for curtainfic. I was puzzled at first as to how to write from the POV of a character who couldn't talk, and then I slapped myself on the side of the head and noticed that I have a person who can't talk living in my house. Not that Molly and my son have anything else in common (in fact my son is kind of an anti-Molly and even she would be put to the test trying to clean up the mess as fast as he can make it; we call him the entropy machine for a reason), but there you go. I'm getting very fond of Molly.

Title: Disturbing the Dust
Content: curtainfic, no warnings apply
Length: 2000 words
Summary: Molly prepares for a new arrival at the Folly.

Disturbing the DustCollapse )

Crossposted at http://philomytha.dreamwidth.org/121960.html. There are comment count unavailable comments there.